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role_playing [2020/05/10 05:45]
radem [RP Basics and Terminology]
role_playing [2020/05/24 00:39]
radem Added Mitsu's "How does it work" paragraph
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   * **PC**: A PC, or "​player character"​ is a character controlled by a player. In our sim, nearly every character is a PC.   * **PC**: A PC, or "​player character"​ is a character controlled by a player. In our sim, nearly every character is a PC.
   * **NPC**: An NPC, or "​non-player character"​ is a character controlled by a Storyteller or staff member (more on that later) who's largely present just to enable or conflict with the PCs. If a group of characters wanted to buy climbing supplies for a mountain expedition, someone might play a shopkeeper NPC for them to buy things from. NPCs are relatively infrequent in PTR.   * **NPC**: An NPC, or "​non-player character"​ is a character controlled by a Storyteller or staff member (more on that later) who's largely present just to enable or conflict with the PCs. If a group of characters wanted to buy climbing supplies for a mountain expedition, someone might play a shopkeeper NPC for them to buy things from. NPCs are relatively infrequent in PTR.
-  * **In-Character (IC)**: Being "​in-character"​ means that interaction is performed as characters. This would be something like Fluttershy talking to Rarity about a sick animal, as opposed to their writers or voice actors talking to each other about going to work. While IC, a pony character ​would have no notion ​of Second Life, or Earth and it'​s ​various countries, or anything ​like that.+  * **In-Character (IC)**: Being "​in-character"​ means that interaction is performed as characters. This would be something like Fluttershy talking to Rarity about a sick animal, as opposed to their writers or voice actors talking to each other about going to work. While IC, there would be no talking ​of Second Life, or Earth and its countries, or McDonald's, or anything ​else from the "real world,"​ as a pony character would have no idea what any of those are!
   * **Out-of-Character (OOC)**: Out-of-character is basically the opposite of in-character or IC. If you were on SL in your pony avatar, but talking to someone about League of Legends, you'd be "​speaking out of character."​ In PTR, we generally indicate OOC chat with double parenthesis %%((like this))%%, or we wear OOC indicators on our avatars to show we're out of character. IMs are also usually considered OOC, though they can occasionally be used to represent IC whispering that other nearby characters wouldn'​t hear.   * **Out-of-Character (OOC)**: Out-of-character is basically the opposite of in-character or IC. If you were on SL in your pony avatar, but talking to someone about League of Legends, you'd be "​speaking out of character."​ In PTR, we generally indicate OOC chat with double parenthesis %%((like this))%%, or we wear OOC indicators on our avatars to show we're out of character. IMs are also usually considered OOC, though they can occasionally be used to represent IC whispering that other nearby characters wouldn'​t hear.
   * **Scene**: Think of this as a scene from a movie. It's a set period of time where a set of related actions happen. An RP "​scene"​ could be an argument between two ponies, or a cheer squad practice, or dealing with putting out a locker room fire after a dragon sneeze.   * **Scene**: Think of this as a scene from a movie. It's a set period of time where a set of related actions happen. An RP "​scene"​ could be an argument between two ponies, or a cheer squad practice, or dealing with putting out a locker room fire after a dragon sneeze.
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 Sometimes, a player or staff member will take on the role of Storyteller and "​lead"​ a scene or set of scenes for a group of characters. This is akin to a Dungeons & Dragons "​adventure,"​ for those familiar with tabletop RPing. In these sorts of roleplays, each player represents their own character, and the Storyteller takes on the role of everything else. This includes all other characters such as enemies, townsfolk, NPCs and such, and also the world itself. The Storyteller,​ for example, can say that there'​s a horrible storm making it difficult to fly, or something like that. The Storyteller'​s mission is to create an interesting scenario for the players to live through via their characters. They do this by setting up challenges, puzzles, and other interactions for the players. A simple example would be something like somepony'​s friend has gone missing after a camping trip, and they ask some ponies for help tracking them down. The search for the missing pony would be the scene or story, and the Storyteller would present clues and answer questions to help the group (the PCs) find the lost character (the NPC). Sometimes, a player or staff member will take on the role of Storyteller and "​lead"​ a scene or set of scenes for a group of characters. This is akin to a Dungeons & Dragons "​adventure,"​ for those familiar with tabletop RPing. In these sorts of roleplays, each player represents their own character, and the Storyteller takes on the role of everything else. This includes all other characters such as enemies, townsfolk, NPCs and such, and also the world itself. The Storyteller,​ for example, can say that there'​s a horrible storm making it difficult to fly, or something like that. The Storyteller'​s mission is to create an interesting scenario for the players to live through via their characters. They do this by setting up challenges, puzzles, and other interactions for the players. A simple example would be something like somepony'​s friend has gone missing after a camping trip, and they ask some ponies for help tracking them down. The search for the missing pony would be the scene or story, and the Storyteller would present clues and answer questions to help the group (the PCs) find the lost character (the NPC).
  
 +===== How Does it Work? =====
 +Usually, someone will initiate an RP with a post briefly describing the setting and whatever their character is up to at that moment. Any other participant is then free to write their own post describing how their character enters the scene and respond to what's happening through actions, dialog, or a combination of both! The easiest way to learn how it works is by observing a few RP sessions between others to get the gist of it.
  
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role_playing.txt ยท Last modified: 2020/05/24 00:39 by radem